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Study: Engaging With Social Media Can Drain Your Brain

Each decision to retweet or not saps cognitive energy, and it adds up quickly. Source: Study: Engaging With Social Media Can Drain Your Brain

The invisible ways Facebook is affecting our choices

Whether it’s using Facebook or Google, our choices are subtly nudged by the human biases acting behind the scenes, argues Tom Chatfield. Source: The invisible ways Facebook is affecting our choices

The Real Reason Why We Love Bad Boys, Toxic Partners and Emotionally Unavailable Men

We can become addicted to the highs and lows of dangerous romantic relationships in a way that makes a break-up from a toxic person similar to rehab from a destructive drug addiction. Source: The Real Reason Why We Love Bad Boys, Toxic Partners and Emotionally Unavailable Men

This Is What Screen Time Really Does to Kids’ Brains

Too much at the worst possible age can have lifetime consequences. Source: This Is What Screen Time Really Does to Kids’ Brains

The 5 Most Common Reasons We Procrastinate

… and how to overcome them, starting today. Source: The 5 Most Common Reasons We Procrastinate

Are We All Becoming Pavlov’s Dogs?

Blame your smartphone (and Steve Jobs). Source: Are We All Becoming Pavlov’s Dogs?

Are My Devices Messing With My Brain?

Yes—and you’re probably suffering from phantom text syndrome, too. Source: You Asked: Are My Devices Messing With My Brain?

How satisfied are we with our jobs?

HOW satisfied are we with our jobs? Gallup regularly polls workers around the world to find out. Its survey last year found that almost 90 percent of workers were either “not engaged” with or “actively disengaged” from their jobs. Think about that: Nine out of 10 workers spend half their waking lives doing things they don’t really want to do in places they don’t particularly want to be. Source: Rethinking Work

What’s so funny about mental illness?

Diseases of the body garner sympathy, says comedian Ruby Wax — except those of the brain. Why is that? With dazzling energy and humor, Wax, diagnosed a decade ago with clinical depression, urges us to put an end to the stigma of mental illness.

Vulnerability to radicalisation linked to depression

Members of the British Muslim community who are most at risk of radicalisation are more likely to have depression and be socially isolated, according to study led by Queen Mary University of London. Conversely, those most resistant to radicalisation were more likely to be migrants not born in the UK, have poor physical health and have a higher number of friends and family. Source: Vulnerability to radicalisation linked to depression, study says

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